This 'n' That

Thursday, June 23, 2005

June 23, 2005
Public Broadcasting Names New President
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Filed at 2:48 p.m. ET

Has there ever been a time when The Corporation for Public Broadcasting was non-political?

''We find it astonishing that Ms. Harrison, given her former prominence as a partisan political figure, would even be considered as a candidate for a job that demands that the occupant be non-political,'' the senators said in their letter.

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Corporation for Public Broadcasting, already embroiled in controversy over allegations of a liberal-leaning bias in PBS programming, chose a former Republican Party co-chairman Thursday as its president and chief executive.
Patricia S. Harrison, the assistant secretary of state for educational and cultural affairs, was selected following three days of closed-door meetings by the corporation's board of directors.
Democratic lawmakers last week urged the CPB to put off choosing a new president, citing concerns about political interference by the corporation's chairman, Kenneth Y. Tomlinson. A Republican, Tomlinson, has been critical of public affairs programming at PBS, alleging that it's too liberal.

In a letter to Tomlinson, Sens. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., and others expressed dismay at the expected appointment of Harrison.

''We find it astonishing that Ms. Harrison, given her former prominence as a partisan political figure, would even be considered as a candidate for a job that demands that the occupant be non-political,'' the senators said in their letter.

The corporation, which was set up by Congress in 1967 to shield public broadcasting from political influence, funnels federal dollars to PBS, National Public Radio and hundreds of public radio and television stations.

In a statement, PBS said it looked forward to working with Harrison. It added: ''We have every expectation that she will execute her responsibilities with nonpartisan integrity.''

Wednesday, June 22, 2005

Telegraph | News | Suicide bomber traced to Britain

The raid by Greater Manchester police was part of an operation, involving MI5 and MI6, which was based on information supplied by Iraqi security services, and intelligence about comments made by, and about, the man in at least one mosque he attended in Britain.

Telegraph News Suicide bomber traced to Britain

Sunday, June 19, 2005

PBS Updates Editorial Standards, Adds Ombudsman

PBS is in a dog fight over proposed budget cuts by Congress.

Here is what writer Laurence Jarvik writes in his book, PBS: BEHIND THE SCREEN, about one of its most highly viewed programs: "The current affairs documentary series FRONTLINE is easily one of public television's most popular and prestigious offerings. Over six million viewers watch each episode, according to originating station WGBH, Boston.

Since its debut in 1983, the only regularly scheduled documentary hour on the national PBS feed has won a shelf of honors, including Emmys as well as Polk, Peabody, Dupont/Columbia, and Robert F. Kennedy journalism awards..."

"...Yet despite its reputation for excellence, a close examination of FRONTLINE reveals a pattern of political bias and shoddy journalism..."

PBS Updates Editorial Standards, Adds Ombudsman

Thursday, June 02, 2005

Telegraph | News | FBI Deep Throat branded a traitor by Nixon aides

Hero or disaffected hypocrite?

"Many portrayed him as a hero. They also played down the fact that the one-time FBI number two was convicted in 1980 of authorising illegal break-ins at the homes of Left-wing radicals, something which would normally rouse their condemnation."

Telegraph News FBI Deep Throat branded a traitor by Nixon aides